Six Minute Sex Ed Episodes

Six Minute Sex Ed helps families talk openly about sex, relationships, and growing up. Created by Kim Cavill, Sex Education Teacher. Level one episodes cover the basics, level two episodes are more complex.

Episodes

Monday May 06, 2019

Welcome back to Six Minute Sex Ed, the podcast that helps families talk about sex and relationships, hosted by Sex Education teacher, Kim Cavill: https://www.teaandintimacy.com/ This episode is Level Two, which makes it more complex than my level one episodes and especially great for tweens and teens. We’re going to talk about Emergency Contraception. What is it? Emergency contraception is birth control taken up to five days after risky sex in order to prevent pregnancy. There are three kinds: two pills and the copper IUD. How does it work? Levonelle prevents ovulation, Ulipristal blocks the body’s own hormones, and the Copper IUD prevents sperm from reaching the egg. See a copper IUD here: http://teenhealthsource.com/birthcontrol/copper-iud-details/ How Effective is it? Levonelle is 95% effective in the first 12 hours after risky/unprotected sex, then steadily drops in efficacy (85% after 48 hours, 58% after 72 hours). Ullipristal is 95% effective for five days after risky/unprotected sex. The Copper IUD is 99.9% effective for five days after risky/unprotected sex, making it the most effective form of EC available. Side effects: All three interventions are very safe and side effects are very rare, though they include irregular bleeding, upset stomach, and headaches. Some medical conditions make EC unsafe to take, so it’s important to speak to a doctor to check it’s safe: if you can’t reach your doctor, text “PPNOW" to 774636 (PPINFO) text with someone from Planned Parenthood who can help. Side effects of the copper IUD include temporary cramping, spotting, and heavier or more painful periods. Tips: Because levonelle is time sensitive, it’s a good idea to have a dose on hand, before it’s actually needed, just make sure it’s available. You can also use some forms of the birth control pill as emergency contraception, but ONLY if taken according to very specific guidelines and it’s less effective than the other options I’ve talked about, so make sure to speak to a doctor before trying this method. Know your rights by educating yourself about the laws in your state: https://www.guttmacher.org/state-policy/explore/emergency-contraception For more info about emergency contraception, check out: http://www.scarleteen.com/article/sexual_health/emergency_contraception?language=es Conversation starters: What are the state laws about emergency contraception where you live? Why is it a good idea to have a dose on hand before it’s actually needed? Email questions for the upcoming mailbag episode to sixminutesexed@gmail.com

Monday Apr 29, 2019

Welcome back to Six Minute Sex Ed, the podcast that helps families talk about sex and relationships, hosted by Sex Education teacher, Kim Cavill: https://www.teaandintimacy.com/ This episode is level one, which makes it good for listeners of any age, but especially great for younger listeners, and we’re going to talk about Sexual Orientation. What is Sexual orientation? Sexual orientation means who people feel attracted to: attraction means wanting to be with someone and have a special, close relationship with that person. Human beings can feel attracted to people of any gender. Some people feel attracted to people of the same gender, some feel attracted to people of a different gender, some feel attracted to both, some don’t feel attraction like that at all. There’s no “one right way” to be a person! After explaining sexual orientation and various terms used to describe it, Kim focuses on community acceptance and what to do about bullying. Here are some helpful resources: GLSEN: resources for families, young people, schools, and educators - https://www.glsen.org/ Welcoming Schools: resources for parents, administrators, professionals, and schools - http://www.welcomingschools.org/ Gender Spectrum: resources for families and young people, including resources about answering questions about mental health, medical intervention, gender nonconformity, transition, and faith - https://www.genderspectrum.org/ Stand for the Silent: anti-bullying organization with resources for kids, families, schools, and communities, as well as resources for perpetrators of bullying - https://standforthesilent.org/ “So you think gay people are going to hell?”: Kim’s essay for religious parents being pressured to reject their LGBTQIA+ children - https://bit.ly/2V3rNVz Conversation starters: Who in you family, friend group, and community is accepting of people regardless of their sexual orientation? If your best friend was being called gay or queer as an insult, what would you do? How would you help? Thanks for listening! Share the podcast with a friend, rate/review wherever you listen, and email me at sixminutesexed@gmail.com or find me on Instagram and Twitter.

Monday Apr 22, 2019

Welcome back to Six Minute Sex Ed, the podcast that helps families talk about sex and relationships, hosted by Kim Cavill, sex education teacher: https://www.teaandintimacy.com/ We're celebrating the 11,000th download of the podcast this week, so thank you for your support! Share it with friends and don't forget to rate and review wherever you listen. This week's episode is Level Two and it's all about Internal Condoms. Kim starts by explaining that internal condoms are nitrile pouches that can be used as barrier protection against pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections during penetrative vaginal or anal sex. She goes on to talk briefly about the history of condom use, including the first documented use of a condom by King Minos in 3000 B.C. - http://www.indianjurol.com/article.asp?issn=0970-1591;year=2013;volume=29;issue=1;spage=12;epage=15;aulast=Khan#ref1 Kim then covers the modern iteration of the internal condom, how it was introduced, how it was perceived, and ongoing problems with stigma and accessibility. She also covers what it is, how it's used, and where to get it. To find your nearest Planned Parenthood, use this link: https://www.plannedparenthood.org/health-center To order the FC2 online, use this link: https://fc2femalecondom.com/ To see a demonstration video, use this link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LJZOCdmnvmc Conversation starters: What are some advantages of the internal condom over the external condom? Why do you think they’re harder to get? Thanks for listening! Send you comments and suggestions to sixminutesexed@gmail.com and follow on Twitter and Instagram.

Monday Apr 15, 2019

Welcome back to Six Minute Sex Ed, the podcast that helps families talk about sex and relationships, hosted by Kim Cavill, sex education teacher: https://www.teaandintimacy.com/ This week's episode is level one, which makes it good for listeners of almost any age, but especially great for listeners ages 6 - 12. This week, we're going to talk about how the sperm gets to the egg. This episode answers common questions elementary age children ask about where they came from. It covers: What happens when an egg cell joins with a sperm cell: "As people grow up, they develop special cells in their bodies that can reproduce, or make babies: these are called sperm cells and egg cells. A pregnancy starts when a sperm cell meets an egg cell." How the sperm cell and egg cell meet: "Usually, the sperm and the egg meet because of vaginal sex. Sex is something grown ups do in private and sometimes it can start a pregnancy, which is when the developing cells grow into a baby inside the uterus, or womb. Vaginal sex, the kind of sex that can start a pregnancy, works like this: a grown-up who has a penis puts it inside a grown-up who has a vagina and they both wiggle around a little bit until sperm comes out of the penis. Then the sperm swim around and try to find the egg inside the person’s womb, while the vagina tries to help the sperm find the egg. The vagina and the sperm work together to try to start a pregnancy." Other ways people have children: adoption and medical assistance Sex is not just for having children, it's also for pleasure: “Sometimes people have sex to start pregnancies, but most of the sex people have is for pleasure, not for pregnancies. Sex is supposed to feel good, which means if it doesn’t feel good, sex should stop. Just remember that sex is something grown-ups do with other grown-ups, it should always a choice, and it’s private." Other great resources to assist parents in answering these questions: Amaze.org's What to say when your kids ask "How are babies made?": https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=100&v=8M8nAyTH7Vc Amaze.org's Help kids learn how babies are made [with Scoops & Friends]: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4uLqoSh55M8&feature=youtu.be Sex Positive Families's reading list: http://sexpositivefamilies.com/sex-positive-families-reading-list/ Conversation starters: Think about other families you know and talk about some of the similarities and differences between those families and your family? Thanks for listening! Make sure to follow Six Minute Sex Ed on Instagram, Twitter, and email questions and comments to SixMinuteSexEd@gmail.com

Monday Apr 08, 2019

Welcome back to Six Minute Sex Ed, the podcast that helps families talk about sex and relationships, hosted by sex education teacher Kim Cavill: http://teaandintimacy.com/ This week's episode is Level Two and it's all about HIV prevention. Kim starts by explaining the three broad categories of HIV prevention: barriers, PrEP and PEP, then goes into detail about each. For more information about barrier methods of prevention, check out https://www.bedsider.org/features/730-how-to-use-barrier-methods-like-a-pro For more information about PrEP, or pre-exposure prophylaxis, check out http://www.whatisprep.org/ For more information about PEP, check out https://www.avert.org/learn-share/hiv-fact-sheets/emergency-treatment Conversation starters: If a friend thought they might have been exposed to HIV, what would you tell them to do? What advice would you give them? If your best friend was HIV positive and wanted to start a family, what should they do? What advice would you give them? Thanks so much for listening! Email questions and comments to sixminutesexed@gmail.com and find me on Instagram and Twitter.

Monday Apr 01, 2019

Welcome back to Six Minute Sex Ed, the podcast that helps families talk about sex and relationships, hosted by sex education teacher Kim Cavill. For more information about Kim, check out her website: http://teaandintimacy.com/ and email her at sixminutesexed@gmail.com This week's episode is level one, which makes it good for listeners of any age, but especially great for families with younger listeners. This week's episode is called, "Can boys wear dresses?" Kim starts off this week's conversation by telling a story about two kids named Charlie and Mikaela, then talks about gender and clothing. We all use clothing to express parts of ourselves to the world: even though many people judge others based on the clothes they wear, clothes don’t have a gender. There’s really no such thing as a boy shirt or a girl shirt: shirts are shirts. Certain colors, decorations, or shapes might lead other people to think different things about the person wearing them, and some places like schools may have rules about what clothes people can wear and all of those things may be fair or unfair. It boils down to this: the things people think about our clothing may be complicated, but our choices don’t have to be complicated, too. They can be very simple, if we wish them to be: we can wear what we want. For more information about talking to children about gender expression, check out these great resources: https://www.plannedparenthood.org/learn/parents/preschool/how-do-i-talk-with-my-preschooler-about-identity https://www.amazon.com/Jacobs-New-Dress-Sarah-Hoffman/dp/0807563730 https://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/sc-boys-who-wear-dresses-family-0329-20160318-story.html Conversation starters: How do you think Charlie felt when Mikaella told him he couldn’t wear the princess dress? Think about your very favorite thing to wear and how it makes you feel, then tell someone about it. Make sure to follow the podcast on Instagram and Twitter to leave your comments and questions. See you back next week!

Sunday Mar 17, 2019

Welcome to Six Minute Sex Ed, the podcast that helps families talk about sex and relationships, hosted by sex education teacher Kim Cavill. For more information about Kim, check out her website, http://teaandintimacy.com/ This week's episode is level two, perfect for families with tweens and teens. This week, it's an introduction to HIV. Kim answers five questions: What is HIV? HIV, or Human Immunodeficiency Virus, is a virus that can be sexually transmitted. How do people get it? People get HIV three ways: through unprotected sex, sharing needles, or from mother to child. What fluids can transmit the virus? Blood, semin, vaginal fluids, rectal fluids, and breastmilk can transmit HIV. How do you get tested? To find a clinic near you, check out: https://gettested.cdc.gov/ To get tested at home, check out: http://www.oraquick.com/ How do you get treated? For more information about treatment, check out: https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/basics/livingwithhiv/treatment.html Conversation starter: If you had a friend who was in a new relationship and they asked you for advice about how to talk to their partner about HIV testing, what advice would you give them? Thanks for listening! Don't forget to rate/review the podcast wherever you listen and support Kim's work on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/sexpositiveparent

Monday Mar 11, 2019

Welcome back to Six Minute Sex Ed, the podcast that helps families talk about sex and relationships, hosted by sex education teacher Kim Cavill. For more information about Kim, check out http://teaandintimacy.com/ This week's episode is Level One, good for listeners of any age, but especially great for families with younger listeners. This week we're going to talk about masturbation. Kim answers four questions in this week's episode: What is masturbation? Does everyone masturbate? Is it private? Is it bad for you? For more information about talking to children about masturbation in a healthy way, read this article: https://www.huffpost.com/entry/masturbation-how-to-talk-to-kids_n_5c3020e1e4b073352832e3c6 Also check out Lydia Bowers's webiste: https://www.lydiambowers.com/ Don't forget to look at Melissa Carnagey's website: http://sexpositivefamilies.com/ If your young ones are around the age of nine, or around the onset of puberty, watch this great video about masturbation by Amaze.org: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TK48R722jyA Conversation starters: 1. How should people show respect for your privacy? 2. How do you show respect for other people's privacy? Thanks for listening! Don't forget to sign up to support the podcast on Patreon:https://www.patreon.com/sexpositiveparent

Monday Mar 04, 2019

Welcome to Six Minute Sex Ed, the podcast that helps families talk about sex and relationships. My name’s Kim Cavill. I’m a sex education teacher and I’m so glad you’re back! For more info about Kim, check out her website https://www.teaandintimacy.com/ This episode is LEVEL TWO and we’re going to talk about intrinsic value Content warning: brief discussions of childhood sexual abuse and trauma This week, on Instagram, Kim asked listeners to suggest episode topics and the suggestions were great. One, in particular, struck her: the suggestion was to do an episode about our worth not being dictated or connected with our decisions to have or not have sex, or to have or not have romantic relationships at all. That's what we’re going to talk about today: intrinsic value. Kim believes every being is intrinsically valuable, meaning no being has to justify it’s value beyond its existence: that our worth is in-born, not bestowed on us by others, or defined by what we do or don't do. Kim talks about her experience with realizing her intrinsic value independent of her sexual decisions. Many of us receive opposite cultural messages: that our bodies only have value if they meet certain standards of beauty, or that we’re only worth what we can produce at our jobs or in school, or that we’re only worthwhile romantic partners if we have certain kinds of sex. Kim rejects those ideas and argues, instead, that we’re all intrinsically valuable regardless of what we look like, what we produce, or whether we engage in sex. If you'd like to read more of Kim's writing about her experience as a survivor, you can do that here: https://www.teaandintimacy.com/single-post/2016/10/11/The-silence-around-sexual-assault If you're a survivor, or you know a survivor, and you need resources, call RAINN at 1-800-656-HOPE or their website: https://www.rainn.org/ Conversation starters: 1. Tell someone three things you LOVE about yourself. 2. List three things you do that make you feel worthy; things you don't do for reward, compensation, obligation, or to impress others. Thanks so much for listening today! Don't forget to rate and review the podcast and sign up on Patreon for access to bonus materials: https://www.patreon.com/sexpositiveparent See you back next week.

Monday Feb 25, 2019

Hi, welcome to six minute sex ed, the podcast that helps families talk about sex and relationships. My name’s Kim Cavill. I’m a sex education teacher and I’m so glad you’re back! I love listener questions and comments. Is there at topic you want me to cover? Email me at sixminutesexed@gmail.com and for more info about me, check out my website https://www.teaandintimacy.com/ This episode is LEVEL ONE, which mean it's perfect for listeners of any age, especially families with younger listeners, and we’re going to talk about naming our feelings Lisa Feldman Barrett a psychologist at Northeastern University has found evidence that anger isn't just one feeling - it’s a whole family of feelings! You can find her on NPR here: https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2019/01/28/688180879/got-anger-try-naming-it-to-tame-it and the link to the study she referenced is here: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22023359 Learning to name different feelings in the family can be a good way to control those feelings. The more emotional granularity a person has, the less likely they are to shout or hit someone who has hurt them. Basically, being able to name our feelings is a lot like having an emotional superpower! We’re going to talk through two different feelings families by playing a feelings game. All you need is yourself, a little bit of space, and someone to play with. If you use AAC, such as Boardmaker symbols, you need your communication tool, too. Educate to Empower publishes great resources, including free feelings cards that you family can use at home to facilitate conversations about emotions: https://static1.squarespace.com/static/50769910e4b07864e5d07147/t/5b46baa01ae6cff696a1e35e/1531361958696/pA3_E2E_FeelingsCards.pdf Conversation starters: 1. What feelings do you feel like you have to hide from other people? Why? 2. What feelings do you feel like you're not allowed to have? Thanks for listening. Don't forget to sign up on Patreon to get access to bonus episodes, as well as episode printables you can use to guide your conversations at home: https://www.patreon.com/sexpositiveparent

All rights reserved

Podcast Powered By Podbean